Tag Archives: Hard Rock

KERRANG FIRST EVER ISSUE

Today, 38 years ago, first ever Kerrang issue was published. AC/DC’s guitarist, Angus Young, was on the cover.⁣⁣

Founded by Geoff Barton, it was first published as a one-off supplement in the Sounds newspaper. Named after the word that derives from the sound made when playing a power chord on a distorted electric guitar, Kerrang! was initially devoted to the new wave of British heavy metal and the rise of hard rock acts.⁣⁣
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Launched as a monthly magazine in 1981, Kerrang! began to appear on a fortnightly basis later, and in 1987 it went weekly. ⁣⁣
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During the 1980s and early 1990s the magazine placed many thrash and glam metal acts on the cover (like Mötley Crüe, Slayer, Bon Jovi, Metallica, Poison, and Venom) but later discarded them when grunge acts such as Nirvana rose to fame. Readers often criticise the magazine for repeating this process every time a new musical subgenre becomes trendy.⁣⁣
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The term “thrash metal” was first coined in the music press by Kerrang! journalist Malcolm Dome while making a reference to the Anthrax song “Metal Thrashing Mad” in issue number 62, page 8, published on 23 February 1984. Prior to this Metallica’s James Hetfield referred to their sound as “power metal”.⁣⁣
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With the emergence of emo and metalcore during the mid to late-2000s, Kerrang! began to heavily feature this musical trend. The revamp was not welcomed by all readers and many complaints were received about Kerrang!’s sudden emphasis on emo and metalcore music.⁣⁣
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⁣⁣In April 2017, Kerrang! magazine, its website, and the K! Awards were purchased by Mixmag Media, publisher of dance monthly Mixmag, along with assets related to defunct style magazine The Face. Mixmag has since formed parent company Wasted Talent, which relaunched Kerrang! as a digital-first title, while continuing to publish a weekly print edition.⁣⁣
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The magazine received a logo change in mid-2017 before receiving a complete redesign during 2018.⁣⁣
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KISS – DYNASTY

Today is the 40th anniversary of Dynasty. It’s the seventh studio album of Kiss. It restored the band to commercial prominence, reaching #9 on the US Billboard album chart and was certified platinum.

“2000 Man”, is one of my most favourites from the album. It’s a cover version of Rolling Stones’s song.

You might wonder why the voice sounds different. Doesn’t sound like Paul Stanley or Gene Simmons. No, not them. It’s Ace Frehley. He’s in charge of the vocal department. Although he had frequently sung backing vocals and had written the Kiss classics “Cold Gin” and “Parasite”, Frehley had only previously been lead singer on his songs “Shock Me” on Love Gun, and “Rocket Ride” on the studio side of Alive II, as he lacked confidence in his ability as a lead singer.

Frehley’s voice, the way he sings, isn’t bad at all, dontcha think?

Check out also the acoustic version of “2000 Man”. Oh, you can also see Ace Frehley without mask!

BLACK BETTY

Hello again Monday. Here’s a down and dirty groove, killer rock riffs to beat the blues: Black Betty.

Many people—including me—think that this song is originally written and sung by Ram Jam. Matter of fact, thanks to Wikipedia, this 20th-century African-American work song often credited to Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter as the author, though the earliest recordings are not by him. Some sources claim it is one of Lead Belly’s many adaptations of earlier folk material, back to 18th-century.

The best known modern recordings are rock versions by Ram Jam, Sir Tom Jones, and Spiderbait, all of which were hits.

David Hackett Fischer, in his book Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America states that “Black Betty” was a common term for a bottle of whisky in the borderlands of northern England/southern Scotland, and later in the backcountry areas of the eastern United States. In January 1736, Benjamin Franklin published The Drinker’s Dictionary in the Pennsylvania Gazette offering 228 round-about phrases for being drunk. One of those phrases is “He’s kiss’d black Betty.” Other sources give the meaning of “Black Betty” in the United States as a liquor bottle.

Sláinte!

BLACK BETTY

Hello again Monday. Here’s a down and dirty groove, killer rock riffs to beat the blues: Black Betty.

Many people—including me—think that this song is originally written and sung by Ram Jam. Matter of fact, thanks to Wikipedia, this 20th-century African-American work song often credited to Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter as the author, though the earliest recordings are not by him. Some sources claim it is one of Lead Belly’s many adaptations of earlier folk material, back to 18th-century.

The best known modern recordings are rock versions by Ram Jam, Sir Tom Jones, and Spiderbait, all of which were hits.

David Hackett Fischer, in his book Albion’s Seed: Four British Folkways in America states that “Black Betty” was a common term for a bottle of whisky in the borderlands of northern England/southern Scotland, and later in the backcountry areas of the eastern United States. In January 1736, Benjamin Franklin published The Drinker’s Dictionary in the Pennsylvania Gazette offering 228 round-about phrases for being drunk. One of those phrases is “He’s kiss’d black Betty.” Other sources give the meaning of “Black Betty” in the United States as a liquor bottle.

Sláinte!